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Wednesday, July 12, 2017

7 Things You Didn’t Know About… Dr. Patricia Lozada-Santone

 Patricia Lozada-Santone
Dr. Patricia Lozada-Santone began her collegiate years at a remarkably young age following in her mother’s footsteps by attending SDSU. The Aztec spirit continues in her family! Find out which other family member kept up with the Aztec tradition in this edition of 7 Things You Didn’t Know About Faculty and Staff!

1. Patricia started college when she was 16 years old.
She was only sixteen when she started at SDSU and graduated at the age of twenty.

2. Patricia worked on the non-smoking laws in California
If you have been to a restaurant and dined in a smoke-free environment, you have Patricia (and her colleagues) to thank.  As a public health advocate, she worked hard to pass the California laws banning smoking in public places as well as the ban on smoking on airlines.

3. Patricia loves music and dancing.
With an exhausting schedule, Dr. Lozada-Santone finds rejuvenation through dancing. “I love to dance. Dancing revives you,” says Patricia. She enjoys all types of music from the tango to the two-step, hip-hop, disco and salsa. The rhythm really does get you.

4. A True Aztec for Life!
Patricia has three generations of Aztecs in her family: Her son, her mother and herself.

5. Her Grandchildren are Trilingual
Patricia has six grandchildren (from 3 months to 6 years of age) who are bilingual in English and American Sign Language and working on their Spanish.

6. She is married to her college sweetheart
Patricia and her husband recently celebrated 36 years of marriage and she says it feels like only yesterday that they were married.

7. California Girl
Born and raised in California, grew up in San Diego, graduated from Samuel F.B. Morse High School (Go Tigers!) and got her B.S. from SDSU (Go Aztecs!).

How Dr. Patricia Lozada-Santone is Making a Difference…

As the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs in the College of Education, Dr. Lozada-Santone finds herself wearing many hats.  She is a professor, an adviser, and an advocate for students.  Working to bridge the gap between Student Affairs and Academic Affairs, Patricia says that she plays a role in empowering students to be successful. When students cannot find the services they need, she is more than happy to problem solve to meet their individual concerns.  “I enjoy my job tremendously,” says Patricia, “it’s time-consuming, but the rewards are gratifying.”